Are You Sending Your Child to College with a Power of Attorney Form?

As a parent it’s easy to feel like your job might never be done but as your child goes off to college this fall, remember that you will not be able to make decisions for them if they are age 18 and above. This is because they are viewed as a legal adult and you are no longer able to make decisions on their behalf which can become problematic in a medical emergency. This is why many parents are increasingly talking about having their college student sign medical power of attorney forms.

Whether you’re sending your student to UVA, Virginia Tech, George Mason, Tidewater Community College, Liberty University, Old Dominion, College of William and Mary, or any of the other great schools in Virginia, get a power of attorney created first.

Hopefully, you’ll never have to turn to or use this form but it can give you great peace of mind if and when something happens to your loved one on campus and you need to be able to take action quickly.

Hospital legal departments are well aware of what is and isn’t allowed, meaning that they might not allow you to make decisions on behalf of an incapacitated legal adult, even if you are able to prove that you are the parent. A power of attorney can name you as a person eligible to receive this information or to make decisions on behalf of your child if something happens to them.

No parent wants to be in the position of trying to get information about their child’s condition from hours or even states away and getting declined. When you have a power of attorney document in place, you can provide this to hospitals or other care providers so that you’re kept informed about your child’s status.

Especially in light of the pandemic and the many different health-related challenges that could face students going off to campus this fall, it’s a good idea to meet with an estate planning lawyer in Virginia Beach and to talk through your options.

 

 

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